Mark Peplow

  • CW0714_CriticalPoint_630m
    Opinion

    A mind-blowing legacy

    11 June 2014

    Alexander Shulgin’s research on psychoactive drugs shows how molecules can take on a life of their own once they leave the lab, says Mark Peplow

  • 0614CW_CRITICALPOINT_300m
    Opinion

    It's life, but not as we know it

    15 May 2014

    A living cell that uses artificial bases in its DNA heralds a profound development for chemistry, says Mark Peplow

  • CRITICAL-POINT_300tb
    Opinion

    Frack and blue

    25 April 2014

    Shale gas will do little to improve the competitiveness of Europe’s chemical industry, argues Mark Peplow

  • Beijing smog
    Opinion

    A war on smog

    28 March 2014

    Chemistry can be a force for good in tackling China’s pollution, says Mark Peplow

  • 0314CW-Critical-Point_300m
    Opinion

    The value of trust

    7 March 2014

    Rebuilding a damaged relationship with researchers should be a top priority for the new boss of the UK’s physical sciences funding council

  • 0214CW-Critical-Point_300m
    Opinion

    Virtually excellent

    30 January 2014

    Assembling a dream team of international researchers could offer a useful snapshot of the UK’s strength in chemical engineering, says Mark Peplow

  • 0114CW-Critical-Point_300m
    Opinion

    The morning after the night before

    6 January 2014

    Replacing alcohol with a more benign drug sounds like a great idea, but it faces insurmountable hurdles, says Mark Peplow

  • 1213CW-CRITICAL-POINT_300m
    Opinion

    A century of isotopes

    21 November 2013

    Once appalled by the military use of his discoveries, Frederick Soddy would pleased by his legacy today, says Mark Peplow

  • 1113CW-CRITICAL-POINT_300
    Opinion

    The judgement of your peers

    24 October 2013

    A bit of hindsight goes a long way in measuring scientific quality, says Mark Peplow

  • Opinion

    Misconduct: on the blog and in the open

    6 September 2013

    When formal investigations of research misconduct are opaque and sluggish, it is inevitable that chemists will take to the blogs to debate suspicious papers, says Mark Peplow