Voices in chemistry

Chemistry World and Notch Communications welcome you to our fifth special collection of content showcasing voices in chemistry. We bring together people from a variety of backgrounds that are driving innovation, challenging cultures, disrupting stereotypes and communicating science to inspire current and future generations.

Chemistry World and Notch are preparing our next digital supplement about the people and technology at the forefront of healthcare innovation. If you would like to get involved in this exciting opportunity, please get in touch. We'd love to hear from you.

PerkinElmer's Ian Robertson beach sampling microplastics

Microplastics – A chance discovery leads to a research passion

Sponsored by , by

Tiny plastics are polluting our waterways, foods and drinks. To understand and combat this contaminant, we need to leverage technologies capable of detecting their presence and understanding their makeup

Nanoform team

Multidisciplinary science kick starts innovation

Sponsored by , by

Nanoform scientists discuss how their diverse personalities and scientific backgrounds foster innovation, helping them tackle problems from different angles, and design better processes

In case you missed them, check out our collections on detectives, innovators, sustainability and health technology

Bundle of dried cinnamon sticks

Cinnamaldehyde

By

How did a tree bark from Sri Lanka become one of the essential flavours of the festive season?

Source:  © Shutterstock

Women in science

UK physical science funder acts to rid its peer review of gender bias

By

EPSRC plans to pilot unconscious bias observers in funding panels and investigate all types of peer review discrimination

Helping hands

The importance of providing young people with mental health support

By , Summer Ward, Helen Gaden

Do you feel safe openly discussing your mental health with your colleagues at work?

Four hands writing letters in different styles

Break down barriers by explaining jargon

By

Journal publishers should do more to help researchers communicate clearly