Podcasts

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  • Orange and black striped caterpillars of the Cinnabar Moth, on wild yellow ragwort flowers
    Podcast

    Ragwort alkaloids

    19 April 2017

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids from Ragworts and other plants are popular with pollinators but a potent poison to livestock, as Mike Freemantle discovers

  • Will o' the wisp over the fens
    Podcast

    Phosphine

    12 April 2017

    Will o’ the wisp, ignis fatuus, hitodama or the min-min light, ghostly balls of fire are common in folklore around the world. Kit Chapman explores the compound that may be the chemical cause of these mysterious lights

  • Vintage Japanese black lacquer tea caddy with auspicious gold makie bamboo forest design, used in the Japanese Tea Ceremony
    Podcast

    Urushiol

    5 April 2017

    The compounds that link poison ivy with beautiful lacquerwork

  • Surgery
    Podcast

    Pancuronium bromide

    19 January 2017

    Katrina Krämer explores one of the key muscle relaxants used in surgery

  • A cattle skull on bare ground
    Podcast

    TCDD or dioxin

    11 January 2017

    Matt Gunther looks into TCDD, or dioxin, and the tragic Seveso accident

  • A man measuring his waistline with a measuring tape
    Podcast

    Orlistat

    4 January 2017

    Chemistry in its Element podcast: Kit Chapman looks at a poster child in the battle against obesity

  • Shutterstock 2091531
    Podcast

    Diazepam

    7 December 2016

    Jamie Durrani introduces one of the biggest selling pharmaceuticals in history, the ‘mother’s little helper’: Diazepam

  • Alaska
    Podcast

    Swainsonine

    30 November 2016

    Did this insidious plant poison kill a hiker in Alaska?

  • Woman with acne
    Podcast

    Benzoyl peroxide

    16 November 2016

    The blondest blonde, the whitest smile, the clearest complexion – all from one essential compound

  • Single-strand damage in DNA
    Podcast

    PARP: Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase

    2 November 2016

    Kat Arney explains how a protein that repairs broken DNA holds the key to killing cancer cells – but only if you stop it from doing its job