Latest

Capacitors inside a comicbook-style BANG cloud, playing on the superhero/supercapacitor angle

Can supercapacitors be the next energy superheroes?

2024-07-22T09:08:00+01:00By

Offering complementary properties to batteries, their time might be round the corner

A headshot of Martti Harmoinen wearing a red shirt and black cardigan in the countryside

Harmoinen’s inverter drives and a crucial step towards reducing energy consumption

By

For the 200th Classic Kit, Andrea Sella celebrates a crucial efficiency improvement for motors

A key has opened a locker containing papers and books

How hoarding knowledge is hurting the industry in the long run

By

Sharing results that are not commercially viable would speed up research

Leo Szilard stands on the right, gestering towards a chalkboard with a piece of chalk in his hand

Triggering a nuclear chain reaction

By

How Leo Szilard’s concept emerged from a rich interchange of ideas across disciplinary silos

A key has opened a locker containing papers and books

How hoarding knowledge is hurting the industry in the long run

By

Sharing results that are not commercially viable would speed up research

Scientist walking through a QR code

Lab digitalisation and industry 4.0

By

How technology can help us run our labs more efficiently

People on a balance

Everyone belongs in the chemical sciences

By

Speaking up to make our workplaces more inclusive

Flixborough disaster

A post-Flixborough risk assessment

By

In the last 50 years, attitudes to safety have improved so that first-hand experience of lab incidents is now rare

Humphry Davy

Engaging with the complex legacy of Humphry Davy

By

Online courses and student-run projects show there’s great interest in discussing Davy’s links to slavery and scientific racism

Our columnists

Philip Ball

Philip Ball is an award-winning journalist, author and broadcaster who explores the history and philosophy of chemistry

Leo Szilard stands on the right, gestering towards a chalkboard with a piece of chalk in his hand

Triggering a nuclear chain reaction

How Leo Szilard’s concept emerged from a rich interchange of ideas across disciplinary silos

Raychelle Burks

Raychelle Burks is an associate professor in the US and an award-winning science communicator and broadcaster.

Three ornate chalices in a row

Using XRF to uncover the secrets of three Irish chalices

Investigating a medieval manufacturing mystery

Nessa Carson

Nessa Carson is a synthetic organic research chemist based in Macclesfield, UK

person in a white shirt with a beard and glasses places a blue pipette rack next to some others. To their right a grid of pipettes dangles down from a liquid dispensing robot

Inertia, decisions and robots

Our cognitive biases can make it difficult to choose what’s best for science

Chemjobber is a US-based industry insider, telling tales of tank reactors and organic obstacles

A bottle of bromine sealed in an additional jar with hazard warnings on the label

Where does bromine come from?

A journey that begins in a former oil field in Arkansas

Derek Lowe is a medicinal chemist in the US, sharing wit and wisdom from a life spent in preclinical drug discovery

Supreme court protest

The US abortion drugs regulation challenge has stalled, but it will return

Having failed in the US Supreme Court, anti-abortion activists are trying other ways to prevent access to mifepristone

Chris Nawrat (aka BRSM)

Chris Nawrat (aka BRSM) is a process chemist at a major pharmaceutical company in the US

The chemical structure of (–)-biploaride D

(–)-Bipolarolide D

A rare example of a [6 + 2]-cycloaddition

Vanessa Seifert

Vanessa Seifert explores philosophical issues from the novel perspective of chemistry

A painting showing an alchemist pouring something from a large flask into a large jar in the middle of a cluttered room

There’s more to alchemy than its mystical nature

It was crucial to the development of chemistry

Andrea Sella

Andrea Sella is a professor of inorganic chemistry in the UK with a passion for unravelling the unlikely origins of scientific kit

A headshot of Martti Harmoinen wearing a red shirt and black cardigan in the countryside

Harmoinen’s inverter drives and a crucial step towards reducing energy consumption

For the 200th Classic Kit, Andrea Sella celebrates a crucial efficiency improvement for motors

Research landscape

A key has opened a locker containing papers and books

How hoarding knowledge is hurting the industry in the long run

By

Sharing results that are not commercially viable would speed up research

California strikes

The striking truth

By

Better pay can benefit the whole research enterprise

Breaking the cycle of teach, test, forget

By

A focus on exams makes it harder for students to cultivate a deep understanding of their subject

Holes in the ‘holey graphyne’ story

By

The challenges – and importance – of questioning published results

Harnessing fear and greed for innovation

By

Many powerful emotions motivate us in the search for new knowledge

UK researchers need to know academic freedom is safe from political interference

By

The UK science secretary’s recent statements are causing alarm in the research community

The UK has rejoined Horizon Europe, but the delays have been costly

By

The deal to rejoin the EU’s science programme makes sense for the country and it’s well overdue

Industry landscape

Fountain pen nib, writing

Letters: July 2024

2024-07-01T13:30:00+01:00By

Readers discuss DDT, reveal new information about Humphry Davy and ponder how to deal with errors

Profiles

A surfer riding a very large wave

Inspiration on a surfboard and in the chemistry classroom

Sarah Gerhardt’s curiosity connects her passions for science, teaching and surfing

Emmeline Edwards

Emmeline Edwards: ‘I connect the dots’

The Haitian-American neurochemist on her journey from Haiti to the US as a teenager, and her journey from chemistry to brain science

Gregory Robinson

Gregory Robinson: ‘We were members of the last generation to attend segregated schools’

The synthetic inorganic chemist on attending a segregated school in Alabama, balancing football and chemistry, and tennis as a muse

Gregory Robinson: ‘We were members of the last generation to attend segregated schools’

The synthetic inorganic chemist on attending a segregated school in Alabama, balancing football and chemistry, and tennis as a muse

How Rainbow Lo is accelerating innovation

Impatient for change, she joined Paris-based sustainable ‘deep tech’ agency Hello Tomorrow

How advances in antiretrovirals have impacted my life with HIV

Eddie Heywood explains how having a range of drugs has helped a whole generation live with HIV – now their biggest concern is remembering to take them

Using analytical chemistry to illuminate the unlisted ingredients in tattoo inks

Discovery that more than 80% of the tattoo inks sampled had unlisted ingredients prompts New York-based lab to launch a website providing chemical information to tattoo artists and their clients

A sustainable career in sustainability

How Xampla’s principal scientist Lynette Holland became an industry leader without sacrificing her work-life balance